~20/20 Leadership In The Church~

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I like to distinguish between a “goal mindset” and a “growth mindset.” A church leader with a “goal mindset” has very tangible, numerical goals to achieve over a specific period of time. Nothing is wrong with clearly defined goals, but there’s a better way of thinking that I call a “growth mindset.” A growth mindset recognizes goals on the journey, but only as part of a process—not as the end results.

Leaders of successful churches are tempted to stop working on themselves, but when the pastor doesn’t grow, the people don’t grow. It’s the Law of the Lid: a stagnant church leader stunts the growth of the church. I hope these thoughts on leadership will inspire you to maintain this “growth mindset,” for your personal benefit and for the benefit of those you lead.

A Function, Not a Title

Elders, deacons, pastors and even evangelists, prophets and apostles were all meant to be functions within the church, whether they are performed in an official capacity or not. They were never intended to be titles. Yes, some of the early apostles did travel between the early churches and ordained elders (Tit 1:5), yet the function of those who lead or govern within the church is listed as a gift in the Bible:

And God hath set some in the church, first apostles, secondarily prophets, thirdly teachers, after that miracles, then gifts of healings, helps, governments, diversities of tongues. (1 Cor 12:28-emphasis added). This means that leadership is just as much a gift of the Spirit as healing. Conversely in the modern day church however, most people become leaders after completing some Bible College course or after they have jumped through their institution’s hoops long enough.

Having failed at being a church leader before I am focused on my calling more than ever before. Intimacy with Christ even while life was closing in on me as a leader in the work place was paramount. My position in life has gotten more demanding although my way of living has gotten simpler and less demanding physically.

Information Transfer versus Relational leadership development

Churches need a unified vision of what a small group is
Churches need to define what a healthy group looks like
First step to get groups off the ground: start your own at your home
Jesus took risks on leaders the church wouldn’t invite into leadership

As a profession, is the pastorate marked by a high rate of turnover? Some observers would respond with a resounding “yes!” And the statistics would bear them out: studies indicate that, at certain points in recent history, the average length of stay for people involved in church ministry was only about two years!
There seem to have been a variety of reasons for this. In some instances the pastors in question weren’t equipped to deal with conflict situations. In others they were simply looking to better their standard of living and move on to a position with more influence and recognition. It’s not hard to understand this latter point of view. After all, if a person enters a ministry situation saddled with a burden of educational debt and then begins to grow a family, it stands to reason that he or she will eventually start looking for a position that provides sufficient remuneration to meet those monetary obligations.
What are we to make of this? Should the phenomenon of pastoral turnover be regarded as good, bad, or indifferent? As you might expect, there are at least a couple of different ways of looking at it.
On the one hand, I’ve read several articles urging people in ministry to resist the idea of moving to a new place of ministry. The authors reason that when God places a man or woman in a certain position, it’s up to Him to provide what’s needed to make that position tenable. If and when it’s time to leave, He will release you with clear signs and signals. He will open the door to new opportunities at the appropriate moment. Until then, the minister needs to realize that the Lord is more interested in developing our character than in making us successful or enabling us to feel comfortable in a particular location.
There’s some good sense in what these writers have to say. As pastors, we should not be looking for new places of ministry simply as a way of avoiding problems, particularly if the problem is yourself, your sin, your blind spots, or your lack of experience. Those issues need to be faced squarely and resolved with the help and guidance of trusted counselors and friends. And yet, as I’ve already suggested, there is another perspective that deserves serious consideration. Personally, I believe there are occasions when it’s entirely appropriate for people in church ministry to start looking for other opportunities—times when seeking out a new situation is a valid thing to do. Let’s examine three of them.
First, it might be time to move on if the leaders at your church are unwilling to negotiate on important issues. Perhaps we can agree that the most important issue in church ministry is the freedom to preach and teach the Scriptures with integrity. Equally important from my point of view is the need for pastors to be in relationship with as many people in their congregation as possible. Sometimes we are adamant about the freedom to preach but less insistent upon importance of consistent pastoral care. Both are vital. Most other aspects of ministry are not going to be scrutinized by the church leadership, so we must decide whether the congregation’s relational expectations are realistic.
Second, pastors should consider carefully how conditions in their place of ministry are affecting their family dynamics. Some churches make intrusive and unrealistic demands upon a minister’s spouse and children. As pastors we should challenge some of those expectations, ask for respect, and require that appropriate boundaries be maintained. If abusive and demanding behaviors continue after several confrontations, a pastor is more than justified in looking for more accommodating places of ministry.
Third, I believe it is also reasonable to start searching for a new place of ministry if, after a year or so of faithfully representing your financial needs to the staff and leadership of the church, you discover that they simply cannot do a better job of providing an adequate income for you and your family. There have been situations in recent years in which the economy in various parts of the country has declined, eliminating jobs and forcing families to relocate. When this happens, the local church can be left struggling to survive. As pastors we must be courageous in preaching about biblical stewardship, but there are also times when we have to make difficult choices for the sake of our own families. Sometimes searching for a new place of ministry is the only way to take care of debt, health care, and other pressing household needs.

Character

  1. It’s true that charisma can make a person stand out for a moment, but character sets a person apart for a lifetime.
  2. You build trust with others each time you choose integrity over image, truth over convenience, or honor over personal gain.
  3. Character makes trust possible, and trust is the foundation of leadership.
  4. Character creates consistency, and if your people know what they can expect from you, they will continue to look to you for leadership.
  5. Over time, is it easier or harder to sustain your influence within your organization?  With charisma alone, influence becomes increasingly more difficult to sustain. With character, as time passes, influence builds and requires less work to sustain.

Communication

  1. Great communication depends on two simple skills—context, which attunes a leader to the same frequency as his or her audience, and delivery, which allows a leader to phrase messages in a language the audience can understand.
  2. Earn the right to be heard by listening to others. Seek to understand a situation before making judgments about it.
  3. Take the emotional temperature of those listening to you. Facial expressions, voice inflection and posture give clues to a person’s mood and attitude.
  1. Persuasive communication involves enthusiasm, animation, audience participation, authenticity and spontaneity.

Credibility

  1. Credibility is a leader’s currency. With it, he or she is solvent; without it, he or she is bankrupt.
  2. Speak the truth. Transparency breeds legitimacy.
  3. Don’t hide bad news. With multiple information channels available, bad news always becomes known. Be candid right from the start.
  4. A highly credible leader under-promises and over-delivers.
  5. Diligent follow-up and follow-through will set you apart from the crowd and communicate excellence.
  6. A trustworthy leader goes the extra mile to remedy strained relationships, even when it doesn’t appear to be required.Failure

Failure

  1. “Failing forward” is the ability to get back up after you’ve been knocked down, learn from your mistake, and move forward in a better direction.
  2. Don’t buy into the notion that mistakes can somehow be avoided. They can’t be.
  3. Failure is not a one-time event; it’s how you deal with life along the way. Until you breathe your last breath, you’re still in the process, and there is still time to turn things around for the better.
  4. You are the only person who can label what you do a failure. Failure is subjective.
  5. Don’t allow the fire of adversity to make you a skeptic. Allow it to purify you.
  6. Generally speaking, there are two kinds of learning: experience, which is gained from your own mistakes, and wisdom, which is learned from the mistakes of others.
  7. Seek advice, but make sure it’s from someone who has successfully handled mistakes or adversities.
  8. When to quit: (1) Quit something you don’t do well to start something you do well. (2)  Quit something you’re not passionate about to do something that fills you with passion. (3) Quit something that doesn’t make a difference to do something that does.
  9. People change when they hurt enough that they have to, learn enough that they want to, or receive enough that they are able to.

Followership

  1. More than anything else, followers want to believe that their leaders are ethical and honest.
  2. When your people see that you are not only competent to lead but also have a track record of successes, they will have confidence in following you, even when they don’t understand all the details.
  3. As a leader, it’s your job to get your people excited about what their work will accomplish; it’s a natural motivator.

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